Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Three Proven Ways to Save Money on Your Electric Bill


Summer utility bills can sting. Between using extra water to keep your yard green and running the air conditioner to stay cool, it can feel like you have to choose between saving money and enjoying your summer. That doesn’t have to be true – particularly when it comes to your electric bill!

Here are three proven ways to save money on your electric bill this month:

1. Avoid “vampires”
As explained by the U.S. Department of Energy, most homes have multiple TVs and computers, which are all connected to various devices, such as DVD players, game consoles, external monitors, and printers. Believe it or not, the energy consumed by all these gadgets in our homes can add up to nearly 10 percent of a household's monthly electric bill! Many people forget to turn off their devices when they aren't using them, and many electronics continue to draw power even after they've been turned off, wasting energy in the form of "vampire loads."

To avoid wasting energy on devices that you aren’t actively using, try investing in a few advanced power strips. There are many different products on the market – some even have timers or activity sensors. Check out this infographic to learn more.

2. Replace old thermostats
If you aren’t using a programmable thermostat, switching to one may make a demonstrable difference in your electric bill. We all know that adjusting your thermostat just a few degrees can improve your energy use. Programmable thermostats allow you to make those slight adjustments automatically, based on your household needs, to ensure you save money.

The experts at CNET.com recommend taking things a step further with a smart thermostat, so that you can control your heating and cooling from your phone or other device. Click here to read their smart thermostat reviews for 2017.

3. Trash old light bulbs
Overwhelmed when you visit the light bulb aisle at your local home improvement store? We are too! But the good news is that all of those new light bulb options exist to help save you money. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, an average household dedicates about five percent of its energy budget to lighting. Switching to energy-efficient lighting is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bills. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year.

After you are done lowering your energy bill, don’t forget that you can lower your pharmacy bill as well. Regardless of your insurance situation, the Free FamilyWize Prescription Discount Card can help you to spend less money on your family’s prescription drugs. Download the free app today.

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Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Ask an Expert: Which Drugs May Be Dangerous for Heart Health?


This post is part of our “Ask an Expert” blog series. In this post, Ken Majkowski, Pharm.D and Chief Pharmacy Officer at FamilyWize, identifies several medications that should be used with care by patients with heart failure. Ken brings more than 40 years of healthcare experience to the FamilyWize team, including 14 years of clinical pharmacy experience in retail, hospital and home care. Read his full bio, here.

In the U.S., more than 1 in 3 adults have cardiovascular diseases. On average, heart failure patients take 6.8 prescription medications per day, resulting in 10.1 doses a day. This estimate does not include over-the-counter medications or alternative treatments.

It is important to note, however, that not all medications are safe for those with cardiovascular diseases. Some commonly used drugs have specifically been identified as potentially dangerous for those with an existing heart condition.

Anesthesia Medications
We know that most anesthetics interfere with cardiovascular performance. While generally very safe for the average person, anesthesia for surgical procedures can be dangerous for patients with heart failure. A recent study observed a 63 percent increased risk of operative mortality and a 51 percent greater risk of being readmitted to the hospital among patients with heart failure compared with patients without heart failure or coronary artery disease. It is critical for all patients to have a comprehensive discussion about their health with their anesthesiologist before going under anesthesia, no matter how routine the procedure.

Pain Medications
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naproxen), and cyclogenase-2 inhibitors (celecoxib, Celebrex) are used very widely in the United States and generally considered to be very safe. Unfortunately, they are less safe for people who already have cardiovascular disease.

NSAIDs can cause the body to retain sodium. Excess sodium causes the body to retain more fluid and forces your heart to work harder. This can be a major problem for people with heart failure, making it critical for heart patients to speak with a doctor before taking NSAIDs for any length of time. Additionally, chronic or heavy use of NSAIDs can also cause chronic kidney disease, another reason to monitor their use.

Diabetes Medications
There are a handful of medications for the treatment of diabetes that should either be avoided or carefully monitored by anyone with concern for their heart health. Specifically, Avandia (rosiglitazone) and Actos (pioglitazone) have both been identified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as potentially increasing the risk of heart failure, and their use is limited to people whose diabetes is not well controlled by other medications. Both drugs can cause fluid retention, similar to NSAIDs, which causes stress on the heart.

If you have a cardiovascular disease, please be sure to discuss each and every medication you use with your doctor, including over-the-counter medications or alternative medications. These conversations are important and can help to keep you safe.

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Wednesday, August 2, 2017

How To Know If A Prescription Discount Card is Right for You



Have you read about prescription discount programs and wondered if they applied to you? Do you have insurance but are frustrated with the amount of money that you are spending at the pharmacy?

Our infographic can help you! Check it out below to understand if the Free FamilyWize Prescription Discount Card can help you to save money on your prescription medication.


Do you have friends or family who could also benefit from the Free FamilyWize Prescription Discount Card? Send them to FamilyWize.org to sign up now!