Showing posts with label human brain. Show all posts
Showing posts with label human brain. Show all posts

Monday, March 11, 2013

Make Brain Awareness Week an Event to Remember

Welcome to worldwide Brain Awareness Week – a campaign that unites families, schools, and communities in a worldwide celebration of the brain. Brain Awareness Week was founded in 1996 by the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and has grown into a global campaign with partner organizations in 82 countries.
Brain Awareness Week
Source: dana.org and http://sinaineurooutreach.wordpress.com


Brain Awareness Week – four ways to make it personal


Here are four ways to celebrate Brain Awareness Week in a way that you and your family will remember for years to come.

1.  Find Brain Awareness Week events in your area


Many organizations are honoring Brain Awareness Week with official events for individuals and families. To find one in your area, search the official Brain Awareness Week International Calendar by country, US state, or city.

2.  Improve your memory with some useful tips


Here are some practicable memory strategies adapted from the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives’ Staying Sharp program.  These tips can help you improve your ability to learn and remember new things, no matter your current age.

  • Pay attention:  Engage your brain and actively attend to what you’re trying to learn.
  • Stay focused:  Concentrate on what you’re doing and reduce distractions or interruptions.
  • Repeat it:  Repetition increases the strength of the relevant connections in your brain.
  • Write it down:  Writing down important things serves two purposes: it constitutes another way to repeat the information, and it provides a visual reminder.
  • Visualize it:  Creating a visual image of what you’re trying to remember can reinforce brain connections, essentially giving your brain another way to access the information.
  • Make associations:  Relate new information to things you already know. By doing so, you’re using existing synaptic connections to learn something new. This strategy can also be useful when trying to remember names: at a dinner party, for example, you might associate “Pam” with “red dress,” “lawyer,” “friend of Bill,” “drinking red wine,” etc.
  • Stay organized:  Keep things you use regularly in the same place, and always return them to their place...put keys on a hook by the door; wallet in a basket on your dresser, etc..
  • Plan and prioritize:  Because multi-tasking may be more difficult, planning our time and prioritizing our activities becomes more critical. This may mean that some things simply have to wait. Recognize that “doing it all” may not be realistic, and let yourself off the hook. This can go a long way toward reducing stress and regaining control over your time and your life.

3.  Make Brain Awareness Week a family affair


The Dana.org site has many brain and memory activities appropriate for kids from kindergarten through 12th grade.  Celebrate the week as a family by trying these:
You can get more downloadable brain activities here.

Family playing a board game
Make Brain Awareness Week a family affair

4.  Take a brain quiz


Want to test your family's (or your own) knowledge on matters of the brain? Here are some simple brain quiz questions. You'll find the answers at the bottom of the article.
1.  About how many nerve cells are in the human brain?
A. One Billion 
B. 10 Billion
C. 100 Billion
2.  What does the eye’s lens do to the orientation of the visual image?
A. Rotates it right 
B. Rotates it left
C. It turns it upside down
3.  Holding a memory in mind while we think about it is called what type of memory?
A. Procedural memory
B. Working/short term memory
C. Momentary memory
4.  During what period of sleep do we dream?
A. Stage IV sleep
B. NREM sleep
C. REM sleep
5.  Name the contact points where one neuron communicates with another.
A. Somas
B. Synapses
C. Axon terminals
6.  What do you call it when a blood vessel in the brain bursts or suddenly becomes clogged?
A. Stroke
B. Aneurysm
C. Aphasia
7.  What do you call an involuntary, fixed muscle response to a particular stimuli?
A. Spasm
B. Reflex
C. Dystonia
8.  Name the part of the brain that is important for emotional learning and memory and its dysfunction is related to anxiety disorders.
A. Amygdala
B. Thalamus
C. Hippocampus
9.  Name the disorder characterized by delusions, hallucinations, and disturbances of thought and emotions.
A. Manic-depressive disorder
B. Huntington’s chorea
C. Schizophrenia
10. To the closest pound, how heavy is the average adult brain?
A. Three pounds
B. Two pounds
C. One pound
Wouldn't it be ironic if you forget this week to do activities or events related to Brain Awareness Week?  To be safe then, partake of some of these recommended steps right away.
Don’t forget….


Answers to Brain Quiz
  1. About how many nerve cells are in the human brain? 
    C. 100 Billion
  2. What does the eye’s lens do to the orientation of the visual image? 
    C. It turns it upside down
  3. Holding a memory in mind while we think about it is called what type of memory? 
    B. Working/short term memory
  4. During what period of sleep do we dream? 
    C.  REM sleep
  5. Name the contact points where one neuron communicates with another.  
    B. Synapses
  6. What do you call it when a blood vessel in the brain bursts or suddenly becomes clogged? 
    A. Stroke
  7. What do you call an involuntary, fixed muscle response to a particular stimuli? 
    B. Reflex
  8. Name the part of the brain that is important for emotional learning and memory and its dysfunction is related to anxiety disorders. 
    A. Amygdala
  9. Name the disorder characterized by delusions, hallucinations, and disturbances of thought and emotions. 
    C. Schizophrenia
  10. To the closest pound, how heavy is the average adult brain? 
    A. Three pounds

Ric Moxley
Contributing Writer